Recipes

Baked apples for the soul

by Kristen Hartke, managing editor of Edible DC

HomesteadPickingApple Picking Locally at the Homestead Farm in Poolesville, MD (Photo by Raisa Aziz)

I really love to go apple picking in the fall. It may be a throwback to my childhood in New England, but there is something about going out to the orchard on a crisp autumn afternoon, with fat bumblebees buzzing around the fallen apples on the ground and filling a bushel basket so full of Staymans, Honeycrisps, and Macintosh that it takes at least two people to carry it. For my family, it was Bishop’s Orchard in Guilford, Connecticut, where my dad and I would pick so many apples that we’d feast on them for weeks after, my mom making everything from dumplings to pie to chutney. But the treat that we loved best was baked apples, oozing and caramelized from the oven and then topped with … Read More

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A Focus on Fresh and Rustic in the Tuscan Countryside

by Wille Harner writing from Tuscany, special to EdibleDC

I’m studying Italian cuisine for several months this fall, in Italy, where the slow food movement was born. My experience is focused at the Villa Borgo Pignano, located in the foothills of Tuscany outside of the town Volterra, where it seems that both cuisine and culture thrive from the gardens. The 750-acre property sources its food from its own fields and its biodynamic garden. Here ancient wheat is ground into flour, farro is grown and harvested on site, and honey is produced from the property’s swarming hives. From the gardens, tomatoes have been in full swing for the summer weeks and have finally started dwindling, as well as copious amounts of salad greens, green beans, potatoes, squash, cucumber, and recently a fresh crop of just-dug Jerusalem artichokes.

Farmer Davide, the head farmer in one of the properties greenhouses giving things a good Read More

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Spicy Tomato Pepper Jam

by Kristen Hartke, managing editor of Edible DC

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Now that we’ve segued from summer to early fall, my little plot in the local community garden is overflowing with the most prolific fruits of the season — namely, tomatoes and jalapeño peppers, all producing like crazy and sweeter than ever from warm days and cool nights. My favorite thing to do with these beauties is turn them into a spicy-sweet jam that can be enjoyed as the weather turns colder and a reminder is needed of summer days gone by. This jam is delicious on burgers, stirred into stews, or spread on toasted baguette slices with or without goat cheese for a tasty appetizer.

If you don’t want to go to the trouble of canning (which is actually pretty easy, but not everyone has room for storing all those jars), you can also place the jam into a quart-sized freezer bag … Read More

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Back-to-School Lunch Rescue: Burrito Bites & Fruit Leather Sushi

by Kristen Hartke

BacktoSchoolA fabulous array of kid-friendly finger foods. Clockwise from top left: Fruit leather sushi made with peaches and watermelon; fresh watermelon “fingers”; fresh Mexican sour gherkin cucumbers (sometimes found at farmers markets and through our friends at Washington’s Green Grocer — and easy to grow at home); Burrito Bites.

Sometimes, when you’re a parent, your toughest dining critic is a two-year old. It gets even tougher when that toddler starts school and inevitably starts measuring the contents of his lunchbox against those of the kid sitting in the next seat. The competition is cutthroat in the cafeteria, where your own progeny sits prostrate in front of a boring, but lovingly prepared, PB&J — no doubt made with freshly ground peanut butter, raspberry jam made from fruit grown in your community garden, and home-baked bread from locally-milled wheat… yet he stares longingly at the monosodium-glutamate-loaded pre-packaged build-your-own-pepperoni-pizza-on-a-cracker extravaganza … Read More

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Overrun with zucchini? Make Zucchini Bread — that actually tastes like zucchini

by Rachael Bender

Zucchini

This year my garden has exactly one zucchini plant.  Multiple tomato plants, four basil, a few dill, and some parsley. But only one zucchini.

However, this zucchini plant has all but taken over almost an entire garden box – spreading itself out into the aisles of the garden, twisting into the tomatoes, and forcing the relocation of two pepper plants.  Seriously, it looks like Audrey II from “Little Shop of Horrors”; in fact, every time I water the garden, I can hear it saying, “Feed me, Seymour!”

So I have spent the whole summer looking for new ways to use all my zucchini.

To my welcome surprise, while reading Gail Simmons book, Talking with My Mouth Full, I was drawn to the section where she writes about how, while she was growing up, her mother used zucchinis for everything, instead of more traditional ingredients.  Yes!  … Read More

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Dolcezza Gelato Raises the Bar with New Venue

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By Tim Ebner

By the time late spring rolls around, Robb Duncan is salivating for summer. It’s the time of year when his business, Dolcezza Gelato, is busy whipping up frozen gelatos with fresh berries, including strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and red, black and purple raspberries.

Summer also means peak herb growing season. And, if there was a Super Bowl Sunday for gelato producers, Duncan says it would be during the last week of June.

“That one week is a big one. It’s just an amazing time for fresh gelato,” he says. “It’s the tail end of strawberry season, and it has a one-week overlap where blueberries, blackberries and raspberries are in season too.”

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This year Dolcezza is ready for that week. The gelato shop recently opened a 4,000-square-foot factory space, behind Union Market in Northeast D.C. The factory space feels light and airy, thanks to skylights … Read More

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A Julep So Cool It’s Blue

By Tim Ebner

As the heat and humidity hit this summer, skip the Manhattan and order up an ice-cold mint julep. Sure, this cocktail has several centuries of history in Kentucky, and it’s the official drink of the Kentucky Derby, but it might also be the perfect remedy for a muggy D.C. afternoon.

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Nick Caruana runs a drinks site called The Straight Up, a Saveur 2014 finalist for best cocktail blog. Caruana says Kentucky Senator Henry Clay is credited with bringing the julep to our nation’s capital where he introduced the drink back in the early 1800s at the hotel where the Willard Intercontinental now stands. The Willard’s Round Robin bar still makes the julep according to Clay’s recipe, but for a summer refresh on this iced bourbon beverage, Caruana adds fresh blueberries.

He muddles mint and blueberries with Maraschino to create the base of his “Mint Blulep.” Then, … Read More

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